Story of a Facade Restoration - magicbrush
The joints on this large redwood cornice ledge were full of rot. After shipping off the paint, we dug out the loosest of the punky rotted wood (this is all non-structural). As you can see, many 3/8" holes were drilled into the wood pieces ( but NOT drilled all the way through the wood). A clear penetrating epoxy sealer (viscosity only slightly greater than water) is then poured and "injected" into the wood (we often use turkey basters and ketchup bottles). Multiple applications of the sealer are required so that it is absorbed throughout the surrounding wood. This product is also called a "consolidant" because it consolidates the somewhat punky wood fibers into the more solid wood that surrounds it. At this point, you now have a surface that can be sucessfully patched. Most fillers fail for two reasons: 1) the wrong fillers are chosen (more on that later) and 2) the underlaying surface is not properly prepared to receive the filler.

The joints on this large redwood cornice ledge were full of rot. After shipping off the paint, we dug out the loosest of the punky rotted wood (this is all non-structural). As you can see, many 3/8" holes were drilled into the wood pieces ( but NOT drilled all the way through the wood). A clear penetrating epoxy sealer (viscosity only slightly greater than water) is then poured and "injected" into the wood (we often use turkey basters and ketchup bottles). Multiple applications of the sealer are required so that it is absorbed throughout the surrounding wood. This product is also called a "consolidant" because it consolidates the somewhat punky wood fibers into the more solid wood that surrounds it. At this point, you now have a surface that can be sucessfully patched. Most fillers fail for two reasons: 1) the wrong fillers are chosen (more on that later) and 2) the underlaying surface is not properly prepared to receive the filler.